SUCCESS INTERNATIONAL ENGLISH SKILLS FOR IGCSE TEACHER BOOK

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Success International English Skills for Cambridge IGCSE® Teacher's Book with Audio CDs (2). Look Inside. Success International English. Marian Barry. SUCCESS. International English Skills. for Cambridge. ® IGCSE. Teacher's Book Third edition. University Printing House, Cambridge CB2 8BS. Marian Barry. SUCCESS International English Skills. for Cambridge IGCSE® Teacher's Book Fourth edition.


Success International English Skills For Igcse Teacher Book

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Success International English Skills for IGCSE Teacher's Book (Georgian Press) [ Marian Barry] on vinttililmelu.ga *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Success International English Skills for Cambridge IGCSE® Teacher's Book with Audio CD (Cambridge International IGCSE) [Marian Barry] on vinttililmelu.ga Showing all editions for 'Success international: English skills for IGCSE. English skills for IGCSE. Teacher's book. by Marian Barry. Print book. English.

The holistic nature of Cambridge IGCSE English as a Second Language is based on the expectation that students are receiving their education through the medium of English, or living in a country where English is widely spoken. Unlike other language exams for non-native speakers, there is no isolated testing of freestanding structures.

Care has been taken in the course to highlight the structures and vocabulary that would be useful for a particular topic. In addition, the Grammar Spotlight at the end of each unit clarifies the purpose of a key structure, but the emphasis throughout is on how grammar can be applied in natural English.

An investigative approach is taken, and students use initiative to solve problems. They apply skills, knowledge and understanding, and are encouraged to undertake individual projects and to work as part of a team. It is important that teachers develop these broader skills if the material is to work as intended. Age range The course is designed to be used by young people in the age range 14— Unit themes reflect the interests of teenagers and aim to promote maturity of thought and outlook.

This approach reflects the aims of the syllabus. Alternatively, the material can be adapted to be covered in one year if this is the time available. The progression of language work, and the selection and treatment of topics, have been carefully chosen to reflect these factors. Ability range The two-tier Core and Extended structure embraces a wide ability range, from lower-intermediate through to upper-intermediate. The material in the course covers all the aspects of exams that Core and Extended students could be expected to meet.

The emphasis is on the more challenging aspects of the syllabus. Course structure 2 The course is organised into ten topic-based units, each systematically and gradually developing the four skills. Exam-style listening and reading exercises are introduced early in the units and fully exploited. Speaking and writing skills are developed at various stages within a unit, but students are not expected to try exam-style writing or speaking tasks until the end of a unit, on the basis that these, the productive skills, are the most demanding.

Teachers should encourage students to combine everything they learn in terms of language and understanding of topics before expecting them to do exam-style writing and speaking tasks without help.

The units offer in-depth topic coverage, with shifts of focus indicated by theme headings. By studying a topic from many angles, students will be better prepared for exam questions where new angles are set on familiar topics, and a certain depth of thought is rewarded. Each unit has a number of regular features including structural work, vocabulary building, spelling, functions, model texts, example answers and an International overview.

The language study grows out of the texts that are being studied, to maximise relevance, accessibility and practical application.

Language study also takes account of Cambridge IGCSE examiner reports available on the Cambridge Teacher Support website , which highlight those areas where improvements are needed, or where students have shown encouraging signs which should be further developed.

Students engage in stimulating group and pair work, in which they share experience and acquire new insights. The photos supplied with the lead-in provide an opportunity to engage students across the ability range. Developing reading skills Most units have two substantial reading texts from a variety of authentic sources, representing a wide range of styles but staying within what teenagers could be expected to experience or imagine.

Texts are chosen specifically to practise skills such as skimming, scanning and detailed reading and matching. Texts are introduced through a range of structured exercises, including speculation and prediction, and vocabulary and language checks. They are often enhanced by a visual image to help students focus fully on the topic. Developing writing skills Writing skills receive particular treatment. The overall aim is to develop a more mature writing style necessary for both a wide range of real-life situations and for exams, whilst stimulating individuality of style and expression.

Developing listening skills There are 16 recorded listening passages with tasks in the exam style, including monologues, announcements, Introduction interviews and conversations.

There are also seven recordings addressing phonology, and eight exercises developing language functions.

Young voices have been used in a few of the recordings for greater authenticity, and a few voices are very lightly accented with non-British accents, including Australian and American, to reflect the new use of such accents in the exam. Listening texts are multi-purpose.

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Not only do they build specific skills, such as listening for a specific point or listening for attitude, they also demonstrate a range of linguistic strategies including functional language e. Developing speaking skills Oral work is encouraged at every opportunity, through whole-class interaction, pair work, reading aloud and so on. Structured exercises develop more understanding of functions, pronunciation, intonation and stress, giving talks effectively, responding to an audience and interacting with a speaker.

The exercises will work at different levels, and with less outgoing students, if teachers give credibility to oral work by making time for it in the classroom. The oral work leads up to exam-style speaking exercises at the end of every unit.

Language study and grammar The language study includes structural work, vocabulary, spelling, punctuation, paragraphing, and idiomatic and figurative language.

This principle should be applied whether students are working on spelling, grammar or punctuation, or building vocabulary. The space given to grammar teaching in the course is balanced against the need to develop a range of skills, and the priority given to such skills in the exam.

For example, a grammatically correct letter of welcome which sounds unwelcoming in tone would be less acceptable than a letter which is slightly flawed grammatically but which is warm and inviting, on the grounds that the first letter does not communicate effectively. A letter packed with spelling errors would not receive the highest marks even if the grammar was perfect. The Grammar spotlight highlights one or two key grammatical structures encountered but not focused on earlier in the unit.

It provides clear, concise explanations and examples, and directs students to look back in the unit for further examples, to consolidate their knowledge. International overview This feature of each unit provides a range of factual and statistical information of global interest and concern, which has been carefully researched from respected sources and is presented via charts, tables and quizzes.

Advice for success The Advice for success sections at the end of each unit provide general tips and exam techniques. The first group rounds off the learning aims and objectives of the unit.

They build student independence by developing learning strategies, and allow students to identify individual learning weaknesses and to see what they need to study in more detail or revise.

It is important to discuss the key advice fully in class and to ask students to highlight or underline points of special relevance.

The advice also contains suggestions for language development outside the class, to further strengthen learner autonomy and responsibility. The exam techniques provide practical guidance about tackling specific types of exam questions and make a useful reference section.

Exam focus The Exam focus provides a summary of the primary learning aims of the unit. Students should be encouraged to familiarise themselves with the Exam focus so as not to be surprised during an exam. However, as every class will be mixed, care needs to be taken to ensure that all students benefit from the work that is done. The following suggestions offer some general ways of supporting students in mixed-ability classes.

The class is put into groups and each one is assigned a component to complete, with groups of students who require more support being given easier tasks. New groups are then formed, consisting of one representative from each of the original groups.

In the end, all the students have a complete set of answers. Throughout this book, a range of ideas for prompting students are given.

The extent to which the prompts are used can be adjusted to suit the level of the students. At the start of a lesson, differentiate your recapping of key points from the previous lesson: to support students, do a quick run-through of an exercise which is the same or very similar to one from last time, while for the more able, offer a new and more challenging context for the same language.

Some of the Teaching Support panels direct teachers to the information that follows, which offers a general approach to the four skills as well as to the study of vocabulary and grammar. This means understanding paraphrase, which means saying the same thing in a different way.

Support students by giving them more guidance with the content of their writing. Writing is imitative — everyone learns by copying from someone who knows what they are doing.

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How does the way a text is written affect our reading of it? This means that students must understand how words and phrases connect one part of a text to another, e. However, Although, Having said that, In addition. Encourage students to look for what is not being said: students need to develop their ability to infer meaning. You can help them to do this by drawing their attention to things the writer has left out and the bias he or she might show against something. For example, if it is a report, focus on its distinctive features: the neutral tone, its use of headings and so on.

Put this vocabulary into context and make sure students are clear about its meaning. What was easy to understand; what was more difficult? Are there any particular accents that students found hard to understand? Put this up on the board and encourage students to refer to it.

If so, record unobtrusively.

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You can go through these with the class at the end. What did they do less well? What did they find easy or difficult? How could they improve?

Students can work on exercises in pairs, in small groups or alone: vary your approach here.

Instead of simply learning the adjective close-knit, for example, students can learn close-knit family or close knit-community, as those noun and adjective combinations are common. At the end of a lesson, encourage students to test each other on the meanings of the words they have written down. On one side is a word, on the other, its meaning and pronunciation.

These cards can then be used in vocabulary games that can be played at the end of a lesson. What is completely different?

What matters is that you give students the chance to both use the grammar and to see it as something they can make use of. When they listen back to the recording they can analyse their performance: Did they make any mistakes? How could they improve their sentences? These include suggestions for mini-projects, including internet research on extension topics, ideas for role-plays and student presentations to the group, writing leaflets or blogs, contributing to online forums, listening to the radio and watching relevant TV programmes, and making posters and videos.

At university, students will have to manage their own learning — the Wider practice sections encourage students to take the initiative. Example answers for exam-style writing questions 8 The exam-style writing questions reflect the language and topics learned in the unit. Students should provide sufficient detail and offer examples to support their ideas. Exams are likely to include two writing tasks. The sentences should be grammatically correct and use correct spelling.

Young voices have been used in a few of the recordings for greater authenticity. Listening passages range from recorded announcements to talks with a factual or opinion-based content. The majority of the question formats following the tasks reflect typical exam styles. Listening texts are multi-purpose. Not only do they build specific skills, such as listening for a specific point or listening for attitude, they also demonstrate a range of linguistic strategies including functional language e.

Speaking Oral work is encouraged at every opportunity, through whole-class interaction, pair work, reading aloud and so on.

Structured exercises develop more understanding of functions, pronunciation, intonation and stress, giving talks effectively, responding to an audience and interacting with a speaker.

The exercises will work at different levels, and with less outgoing students, if teachers give credibility to oral work by making time for it in the classroom. The oral work leads up to exam-style speaking exercises at the end of every unit. Language study and grammar The language study includes structural work, vocabulary, spelling, punctuation, paragraphing, and idiomatic and figurative language. Students should be encouraged to study the examples in the coursebook and to work out meanings, patterns, rules and exceptions.

This principle should be applied whether students are working on spelling, grammar or punctuation, or building vocabulary. The space given to grammar teaching in the course is balanced against the need to develop a range of skills, and the priority given to such skills in the exam. For example, a perfectly grammatical letter of welcome which sounds unwelcoming in tone would be less acceptable than a letter which is slightly flawed grammatically but which is warm and inviting, on the grounds that the first letter does not communicate effectively.

A letter packed with spelling errors would not receive the highest marks even if the grammar was perfect. The Grammar spotlight highlights one or two key grammatical structures encountered but not focused on earlier in the unit.

It provides clear, concise explanations and examples, and directs students to look back in the unit for further examples, to consolidate their knowledge. The use of a supplementary grammar book may be helpful, at your discretion, particularly for weaker students who might benefit from drill practice. It is important that teachers require students to apply their knowledge of structures after they have been practised, if supplementary books are used.

Key advice 4 The Key advice at the end of each unit falls into two groups: general tips and exam techniques. The first group round off the learning aims and objectives of the unit. They build student independence by developing self-help learning strategies, and allow students to identify individual learning weaknesses and to see what they need to study in more detail or revise.

It is important to discuss the key advice fully in class and to ask students to highlight or underline points of special relevance. The advice also contains suggestions for language development outside the class, to further strengthen learner autonomy and responsibility. The exam techniques provide practical guidance about tackling specific types of exam questions and make a useful reference section.

Unit focus The Unit focus provides a summary of the primary learning aims of the unit, and shows how they crossreference with particular kinds of exam exercises for Core and Extended levels. Students should be encouraged to familiarise themselves with the Unit focus so as not to be thrown off guard in the exam.

For simplicity and clarity, only the main points of focus of each unit are highlighted, not the wide range of skills that have, in fact, been covered. Provision for differentiated work The following strategies can be used to make certain exercises more accessible for Core students aiming for the E—G range. Used with discrimination, they make lessons more stimulating and enjoyable in general. The class is put into groups and groups are assigned their components to complete, with weaker groups being given easier tasks.

New groups are then formed, consisting of one representative from each of the original groups. In the end, all the students have a complete set of answers. The language study grows out of the texts that are being studied, to maximise relevance, accessibility and practical application.

Language study is also slanted to take account of IGCSE examiner reports available on the Cambridge Teacher Support website , which highlight those areas where improvements are needed, or where students have shown encouraging signs which should be further developed.

Students engage in stimulating group and pair work, in which they share experience and acquire new insights. Teachers should use the lead-in to expose and remedy knowledge gaps, such as key vocabulary needed for later work in the unit.

Developing reading skills Most units have two substantial reading texts from a variety of authentic sources, representing a wide range of styles but, as in the exam, staying within what teenagers could be expected to experience or imagine. Texts are chosen specifically to practise skills such as skimming, scanning and detailed reading as required by IGCSE.

Texts are introduced through a range of structured exercises, including speculation and prediction, and vocabulary and language checks. They are often enhanced by a visual image to help students focus fully on the topic. Teachers should make full use of the visual support to draw in weaker students. Some texts are accompanied by a checklist which students should refer to after reading to help them understand features inherent in textual organisation, such as paragraphing and argument development.

Follow-up exercises always start with comprehension to check understanding and lead on to detailed language study which has grown out of the text. The reading comprehension question format reflects the actual exam.

Writing skills Writing skills receive particular treatment. The overall aim is to develop a more mature writing style which meets exam requirements whilst stimulating individuality of style and expression.

A range of devices are employed which are suitable for use at different Introduction levels, so that teachers can involve the weaker students fully. There is a special focus on the subtle areas of tone, register and audience awareness which repay detailed study. Form-filling Students at both Core and Extended levels are required, in Exercise 3 of the exam, to complete a form based on a scenario.

Six of the coursebook units include formfilling practice in the Exam-style questions section.

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The reading skills that students are developing throughout the units will help them with the skills of interpretation and deduction that the form-filling exercise requires. The emphasis is on accurate interpretation and transfer of information, on the grounds that information needs to be correct to be effective.

Core students have to write two sentences at the end of the form; Extended students have to write only one, but of a specified length 20 words.

The sentences should be grammatically correct and use correct spelling. Young voices have been used in a few of the recordings for greater authenticity. Listening passages range from recorded announcements to talks with a factual or opinion-based content. The majority of the question formats following the tasks reflect typical exam styles.

Listening texts are multi-purpose. Not only do they build specific skills, such as listening for a specific point or listening for attitude, they also demonstrate a range of linguistic strategies including functional language e.

Speaking Oral work is encouraged at every opportunity, through whole-class interaction, pair work, reading aloud and so on. Structured exercises develop more understanding of functions, pronunciation, intonation and stress, giving talks effectively, responding to an audience and interacting with a speaker. The exercises will work at different levels, and with less outgoing students, if teachers give credibility to oral work by making time for it in the classroom.

The oral work leads up to exam-style speaking exercises at the end of every unit. Language study and grammar The language study includes structural work, vocabulary, spelling, punctuation, paragraphing, and idiomatic and figurative language. Students should be encouraged to study the examples in the coursebook and to work out meanings, patterns, rules and exceptions.

This principle should be applied whether students are working on spelling, grammar or punctuation, or building vocabulary.Language study is also slanted to take account of IGCSE examiner reports available on the Cambridge Teacher Support website , which highlight those areas where improvements are needed, or where students have shown encouraging signs which should be further developed.

An investigative approach is taken, and students use initiative to solve problems. Students can work on exercises in pairs, in small groups or alone: vary your approach here. What is completely different? The extent to which the prompts are used can be adjusted to suit the level of the students. This principle should be applied whether students are working on spelling, grammar or punctuation, or building vocabulary.

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